Chris Cuomo To Florida’s Andrew Gillum On Health-Care Plan: ‘You Don’t Know Exactly How To Pay For It Yet’

Scott Morefield | Reporter

CNN’s Chris Cuomo on Wednesday ended his conversation with Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum by noting that the Tallahassee mayor doesn’t yet know “exactly how to pay” for his health-care proposal.

WATCH:

As the interview turned from the Trump administration’s hurricane response in Puerto Rico last year to the Florida election, Cuomo noted GOP opponent Ron DeSantis has a “little bit of strength” in Hispanic polling.

“Do you think this issue [hurricane response] could make a difference?” Cuomo asked Gillum. “He’s Trump’s guy. Trump calls it an unsung success. Does he? And is this something you’re going to go after?”

“First of all, I think that we are going to get our fair share of the Hispanic vote,” said Gillum. “Not only will this storm and this storm response that Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Trump share in will that be a problem for them, but his position on health care is going to be a problem for him. He doesn’t believe in expanding Medicaid for 700,000 of the most medically needy people in this state.”

Gillum went on to contrast what his party is “offering” versus what he considered DeSantis’ lack of “real ideas to move this state forward.”

In concluding the interview, Cuomo noted what he considered a key problem with both candidates.

“As we’ve talked before and we have to talk more on this show about as an issue, his problem is he doesn’t want to cover enough people,” Cuomo said. “Your problem is you want to cover everybody but you don’t know exactly how to pay for it yet.”

Gillum could be heard interjecting a “Well …” but Cuomo kept going.

“And those are interesting issues for the electorate, and I know you have your ideas,” he said as he concluded the interview.

In saying goodbye, Gillum expressed his desire to share his “plan to pay for it” the next time around.

Follow Scott on Facebook and Twitter.

Tags : andrew gillum chris cuomo health care
© Copyright 2010 - 2018 | The Daily Caller